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OLlive oil article LJStar081

Published in the

Lincoln (NE, USA) Journal Star

November. 19, 2014

 

 

 

 

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FreshFruitPortal.com

http://www.freshfruitportal.com/2014/07/21/first-cbs-inspection-in-europe-disappointing-for-south-african-citrus-growers/?country=australia

July 21st, 2014
The South African citrus industry is on the hunt for answers as to how a consignment with citrus black spot (CBS) was intercepted in Europe, after receiving word from plant health authorities in the Netherlands today.

citrus – peel unravel panorama

citrus-peel-unravel-panorama

The interception is the first this year and as a result the industry has been issued a notification of phytosanitary non-compliance.

“This is disappointing news particularly considering the steps taken to ensure compliance with, and demonstrate commitment to meeting, the European Union’s requirements, at enormous cost to the SA government and citrus industry – including testing regimes and a comprehensive CBS risk management,” Citrus Growers’ Association (CGA) of Southern Africa CEO Justin Chadwick said in a release.

 

“The Citrus Growers Association (CGA) will today dispatch an accredited expert to accompany representatives of the DAFF [Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries] to the farm in question to investigate how CBS could have slipped through the risk management net and, importantly, to propose any remedial measures necessary to prevent a reoccurrence.”

Chadwick said CGA’s special envoy to the EU, Deon Joubert, was dispatched to Europe today for discussions on the matter with all stakeholders.

“While today’s interception is a setback, it is also an opportunity for us to improve our risk management processes, which we will continue to implement in order to ensure unrestricted trade conditions for the immediate future,” Chadwick said.

The executive emphasized that for the long term, it was important to note that there has been no agreement since 1992 between South Africa and the European Union on the risk of CBS being transmitted by fruit.

“There is still no agreement on whether commercial fruit from areas where CBS is present is a risk to citrus-producing countries of the EU where CBS is absent, the magnitude of any possible risk, or the measures required for adequate mitigation of the actual risk,” he said.

“It remains imperative that this difference of opinion – and the science that underlies it – is resolved once and for all.”

He added the EU continued to be an important historic market for the South African citrus industry.

“The CGA calls on the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Minister Senzeni Zokwana, to prioritise the swift and amicable resolution of the CBS dispute with the European Union,” Chadwick said.

“The future of this important agricultural sector, the 120 000 jobs and their 1,2 million dependents depend on it.”

Photo: http://www.shutterstock.com

http://www.freshfruitportal.com

 

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FRESH

PLAZA

Discovery of fruit fly infested mangoes in one of the shipment from Pakistan in the United Kingdom (UK) has threatened import of Pakistani mangoes to the European Union this year. Concerned authorities in Pakistan had made bold claims that all the necessary measures have been taken to ensure quality control of the Pakistani mangoes in a bid to increase the export of the exotic fruit to EU in be presence of ban on Indian mangoes. The Department of Plant Protection (DPP) decided to stop exporting mangoes to UK and EU without hot water treatment with immediate effect.

UK’s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) on June 17 inspected a shipment of mangoes from Pakistan it was found infested with fruit fly. This is the first case of fruit fly infestation of Pakistani mangoes. If four more such shipments are found, EU will impose the ban on the import of Pakistani mangoes.

Department of Plant Protection (DPP) has taken precautionary measures to avoid any possible EU ban and have decided to export only those mangoes which have received the hot water treatment to kill all the fruit flies.

Pakistan earned about $25 million by exporting mangoes to EU during 2013 mango season. EU earlier had banned Indian mangoes and it is an opportunity for Pakistani mango producers to fill the gap with good quality and better tasting mangoes from Pakistan.

Source: newspakistan.pk
Publication date: 6/24/201

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International

TheNews

http://www.thenews.com.pk/Todays-News-3-249329-Farms-declared-eligible-to-export-mangoes-to-EU

Salman Siddiqui
Sunday, May 11, 2014
From Print Edition

KARACHI: The Pakistan Quarantine Department of Plant Protection (DPP) has so far declared only 15 farms of mangoes eligible to export the fruit to the Europe Union (EU) without hot water treatment, All Pakistan Fruit and Vegetable Exporters, Importers and Merchants Association (PFVA) reported on Saturday.

However, majority of the farms located in Sindh will still have to treat the fruit to kill flies, as the DPP has so far declared only one farm eligible in the province to export the fruit without the treatment to EU nations, Waheed Ahmed, spokesman of the association, said after attending a meeting summoned by the Ministry of National Food Security and Research in Islamabad the other day.

The export of the fruit is set to start from May 25, while Sindh is the first province in the country that picks mangoes. Punjab follows Sindh in picking and exporting mangoes, it was learnt.

The food secretary chaired the said meeting. Another participant of the meeting Seerat Asghar Joura said that the department had initially estimated to declare eligible about 100 farms for the export with the treatment.

Tariq Khan, deputy director of DPP, said that the process of the inspection and registration of farms had yet not been over in the country. “This may remain lasted till Punjab starts producing and exporting the fruit sometime in July,” he said.

Officials of the quarantine department, which is responsible to make sure exporting pest and fruit fly-free mangoes to the world, have visited 35 orchards in Sindh and 36 orchards in Punjab so far.

The department has approved only one farm in Sindh to export the fruit without hot water treatment, while other 34 could not export their fruit without giving the treatment, sources said.

While in Punjab, the department has approved 14 orchards, rejected three and asked remaining 19 orchards to improve their standards to export their fruit without the treatment, they said.

There are only four with the approved treatment plants. Durrani Associates own three of them. Babar Durrani of the associates said that his company was charging Rs20 per kilogramme for the treatment.

“The treatment helps exporter to earn up to 50 percent additional revenue against those who export their fruits without the treatment,” Durrani said.

He, who also attended the meeting, said that exporting pest- and fly-free mangoes to EU was a serious challenge instead of an opportunity. If the EU bans Pakistan like it banned Indian mangoes in April might result into halt of exports of the fruit to many other counties as well, he said.

Durrani said that the meeting resolved to export only quality fruit to EU. “All exporters at the meeting agreed to set their focus on quality instead of quantity to EU nations,” he said.

Ahmed of PFVA said that the ministry had also approved exporting mangoes into boxes of weight of two kilogrammes, three kg, four kg, and five kg, and banned export of the fruit in 1.5 kg of box.

“The box of 1.5 kg cannot accommodate big size mangoes, while there are always chances of fruit flies in small size mangoes,” he said.

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Farming Life

19 April 2014

http://www.farminglife.com/ufu-watch/new-integrated-pest-management-plan-launched-1-6010443

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Representatives of the Water Catchment Partnership local shows and events to deliver one message incorporating the ethos from all organisations to effectively tackle the problem of pesticides in the water environment particularly in Drinking Water areas and to promote best practice.

 

The Ulster Farmers’ Union are pleased to announce that the Voluntary Initiative have launched a new Integrated Pest Management Plan (IPMP).

Tim McClelland representing the UFU on the VI commented: “The NFU have been instrumental in developing this tool for the farming industry ensuring it is user friendly and effective. There is a requirement under the Sustainable Use Directive for Member States to encourage the uptake of Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

“The European Commission defines this as economically and environmentally sustainable management of pests, weeds and diseases using cultural, chemical, physical and biological controls.”

To meet this new requirement the UFU welcomes that the UK Regulators have recognised that our farmers do actually carry out a wide range of these practices. The adoption of an agreed voluntary approach to demonstrate IPM as opposed to regulatory approaches has been well received within the industry. To satisfy this requirement the new IPM plan for the VI is available and can be accessed at http://www.voluntaryinitiative.org.uk/ipmp

The new IPM plan for the VI will replace the original VI Crop Protection Management Plan (CPMP). This new IPM Plan is user friendly and will help demonstrate and record good practice. The Voluntary Initiative illustrates how good practice can convince Government that voluntary approaches are better than any regulatory one.

Changes to Current Rules on Grandfathers Rights for Pesticide Users

A current exemption for Pesticides users in UK law is commonly known as “grandfather rights”. This exemption will continue until 26 November 2015. After this date everyone who uses plant protection products authorised for professional use must hold a certificate of competence.

Option 1- Is the Existing Certification route.

Option 2 – Is the New Level 2 Certificate in the Safe Use of Pesticides for those farmers who have been operating under “Grandfather Rights”. The New Level 2 Certificate work booklet can be found at the link: http://www.nptc.org.uk/qualificationschemedetail.aspx?id=474

To help gauge industry demand and ensure sufficient resources are made available to meet this important industry need please register an expression of interest at http://www.cafre.ac.uk/2014/03/grandfathers-rights/ you can also contact Industry Training Administration team by email industry.trainingadmin@dardni.gov.uk.

The Water Catchment Partnership

Representatives of the Water Catchment Partnership established in 2013 met recently to progress plans for attending the 2014 RUAS Balmoral Show. The Partners promote the importance of proactively working together to raise awareness of best practice when using pesticides in the garden or on the farm.

Over the past year the Water Catchment Partnership representatives have attended and hosted a series of events with visits in the pilot Derg Catchment area.

Stop and think about the water you drink – use pesticides responsibly.

 

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Flickr/Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

 

There was one unpleasant surprise in what was otherwise an invigorating and useful high-level discussion at the EU-Africa Business Forum this week (1 April) in Brussels, Belgium: a skewed focus on success and perhaps a reluctance to admit to failure.

The session was organised to draw up a set of core messages on how to get the business sector and public research organisations to work closer and better together on ensuring food security in Africa and Europe.

These were then fed into 4th EU-Africa Summit of Heads of State and Government of the European Union and African Union also taking place this week (2-3 April) in Brussels.

Following several ‘taster’ presentations that helped set the scene with successful examples, my task was to moderate a discussion that would identify both what works and what doesn’t work in making the two sectors more responsive to each other’s needs.
“It is time to look honestly and constructively at failures in the way we do things — in agricultural research and beyond.”

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Mićo Tatalović
“But despite a lively discussion involving most of the 50 or so delegates, and despite repeated calls to also hear examples of what worked less well, or not at all, we mostly only heard examples of success or thoughts on what ought to happen next.”

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Even a delegate who was involved in setting up a repository of examples of best practice aimed at farmers, when asked if we should also have a repository of ‘worst practice’ — things to definitely avoid, seemed unprepared for the question and unsure of how to answer it.

As in science, where in general only results that show something working well get reported, it seems that the participants preferred to highlight things that have worked well. From the launch of new small and medium size enterprises following on from EU Framework Programme 7’s research project in Egypt, to finding an innovative use for unpopular but productive mushroom farming in Rwanda, the success stories are many.

But as in science, our perspective and understanding are skewed if we never see the rest of the iceberg — the hypotheses that did not turn out to be correct — and don’t investigate why that was.

That things don’t always work the way we intended them to is evident from the various suggestions for new and different initiatives, such as innovative ways of financing agricultural research between the public and private sectors. If everything done so far was a success, why bother changing things — why not repeat past successes?

This lack of examples of less-successful initiatives limits our opportunity for learning.

Indeed, while it may be difficult to own up to having worked on project that just did not deliver, without recognising failure and understanding why it happened, we are unlikely to avoid it in future.

This is why SciDev.Net’s news recently started looking more proactively at past initiatives originally launched with high acclaim and high expectations, only to slowly fade from the media spotlight. These follow-up stories (‘whatever happened to…?’) offer valuable insights for others to learn from.

Recent examples include a 2008 MalariaEngage website designed to find a new way to crowdsource finding for malaria research in Africa; and Science for Humanity, which attempted to link up scientists and NGOs for better adoption of research in development work.

It is time to look honestly and constructively at failures in the way we do things — in agricultural research and beyond.

http://www.scidev.net/global/innovation/scidev-net-at-large/eu-africa-research-must-start-learning-from-failures.html

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