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Archive for the ‘Phytosanitary’ Category

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FreshFruitPortal

https://www.freshfruitportal.com/news/2018/03/13/chile-medfly-outbreak-valparaiso-region/

Chile: Medfly outbreak in Valparaiso region

March 13 , 2018

An outbreak of Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly) has been discovered in Chile’s Valparaiso region, in a rural area of a commune that lies to the north of the capital Santiago.

Eight insects were found in traps in the commune of Los Andes, and authorities have now established a 7.2-kilometer control area. Additional traps have also been placed and contingency plans have been implemented.

There have been numerous Medfly detections in recent months, with authorities finding an insect in the eastern Santiago suburbof Las Condes in December, and the following month finding 16 Medflies in San Bernardo to the capital’s southwest.

The Agricultural and Livestock Service (SAG) said the recent detections had been made thanks to the surveillance network present throughout Chile.

“There was an opportune detection, thanks to the trapping system that the institution has throughout the country and thanks to our personnel who acted quickly,” SAG national director Angel Sartori said.

“To control and eradicate this outbreak we ask for collaboration from the people in facilitating the entry of inspectors into their homes to carry out the necessary treatments for these cases.

“In addition, we reiterate that people who travel outside of the country must not enter Chile with products that are not authorized by SAG, as they can put our agriculture at risk.”

The Medfly is one of the most damaging agricultural pests in the world, attacking more than 250 species of fruit and vegetables.

www.freshfruitportal.com

 

 

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Faw RISK aS REPT Cover

The document, ‘Pest Risk Assessment of the Fall Armyworm in Egypt’ has just been released by the Feed the Future Integrated Pest Management Lab at VA Tech. The document provides information on the following subjects:

FAW identification

Biology

Damage

Mortality and dispersal

Spread and establishment

Risk to other countries

Economic impact

Development of a management plan for the FAW in Egypt

The document can be accessed on the IPM IL website at:

https://ipmil.oired.vt.edu/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Egypt-FAW-Risk-Assessment-12-14-17.pdf

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From the Aliens’ list/PestNet

From: Arne Witt <a.witt@cabi.org>
Date: 9 November 2017 at 20:25
Subject: [Aliens-L] FAW

New report reveals cost of Fall Armyworm and provides recommendations for control

 

fall-armyworm-frontal-MER-563x744

The report, commissioned by the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), reviews the current evidence of the potential impact of the pest and quantifies the likely economic effect on agricultural sectors in affected countries and regions if left unmanaged.

In the absence of any control methods, we estimate that the pest has the potential to cause huge maize yield losses in Africa and we expect it to spread throughout suitable habitats in mainland sub-Saharan Africa within the next few cropping seasons. Northern Africa and Madagascar are also at risk. This would clearly have a huge impact on food security and the achievement of SDG 2 (Zero Hunger).

Control of Fall Armyworm requires an integrated pest management (IPM) approach and immediate recommendations we make in the report include raising awareness on Fall Armyworm symptoms, early detection and control, and the creation and communication of a list of recommended, regulated pesticides and biopesticides to control the pest. Work must also start to assess which crop varieties can resist or tolerate Fall Armyworm. In the longer run national policies should promote lower risk control options through short term subsidies and rapid assessment and registration of biopesticides and biological control products.

To see the reports:

Download the 10 page summary of the evidence note

Download the full evidence note

 

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Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as Citrus greening, has been confirmed in Trinidad for the first time. The disease, which was detected on leaves from a lime tree in the north of the island, can cause devastating yield loss for Citrus growers and is regarded as one of the most important threats to global commercial and […]

via Citrus greening detected in Trinidad — The Plantwise Blog

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EPPO Reporting Service 2017 no. 6- Diseases

2017/117 First report of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in Panama

In February 2016, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (associated with huanglongbing – EPPO A1 List) was detected for the first time in Panama. The disease was found on citrus the areas of Guabito and Las Tablas (district of Changuinoa, province of Bocas del Toro). The Ministry of Agriculture has declared a state of phytosanitary emergency and a national contingency plan has been elaborated to contain the disease and its vector, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae – EPPO A1 List). In July 2016, 101 citrus plants at the sites where the disease was found were destroyed (burnt). In addition to plant destruction and surveys, the development of a national certification scheme for the production of healthy planting material of citrus has been undertaken. The situation of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in Panama can be described as follows: Present, only in some areas (province of Bocas del Toro), under official control.

Source: INTERNET Gobierno de la República de Panamá – Noticias (2017-06-05) Más de B/. 1 millón invertirán Panamá y Taiwán en proyecto para control de la enfermedad de los cítricos HLB. http://mida.gob.pa/noticias_id_4875.html – Noticias (2017-06-02) Sector public y privado analizan normativa de viveros cítricos. http://mida.gob.pa/noticias_id_4495.html – Noticias (2016-08-16) MIDA y Embajada de China (Taiwan) coordinan proyectos técnicos. http://www.mida.gob.pa/noticias_id_3977.html – Noticias (2016-07-25) Decomisan plantones de cítricos en puesto de control de cuarentena en Hornitos. http://mida.gob.pa/noticias_id_3898.html – Noticias (2016-06-01) MIDA impulsa plan de emergencia para control de enfermedad en los cítricos. http://www.mida.gob.pa/noticias_id_3739.html República de Panamá. Ministerio de Desarrollo Agropecuario. Resolucion no. OAL039-ADM-2016 of 2016-02-03. Gaceta Oficial Digital, jueves 17 de marzo de 2016 no. 27991. http://extwprlegs1.fao.org/docs/pdf/pan163996.pdf

Pictures: ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’. https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/LIBEAS
Additional key words: new record Computer codes: LIBEAS, DIAACI, PA

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CalAgToday-Logo-01

Huanglongbing is causing concern in California – California Agriculture News | California Agriculture


https://californiaagtoday.com/wp-content/themes/calagtodaynew/js/html5.js?ver=3.7.3

April 27, 2017

Increase of Huanglongbing in California Causes Concern

 By Brian German, Associate Broadcaster

Southern California has seen a concerning increase in the amount of trees that are infected with Huanglongbing, or citrus greening disease. California Ag Today discussed the news with Beth Grafton-Cardwell, an IPM Specialist and Research Entomologist for the UC Riverside Entomology Department stationed in the San Joaquin Valley.  She agreed that there is an increased concern surrounding HLB.

“It kind of exploded this fall, and it’s kind of continuing. And, that’s not unexpected. The Department of Food and Ag removes only the trees that are polymerase chain reaction – positive. And sometimes, it takes one to two years for a tree for you to be able to detect the bacteria using that method,” Grafton-Cardwell said.

Beth Grafton-Cardwell

There is no cure currently available for HLB, so once a tree is infected, it will eventually die.  Researchers continue working to find a possible cure for HLB, or at the very least, a more effective means of diagnosing infected trees. “Most of the techniques that are going to help us cure or prevent the disease from being transmitted are five to ten years away. Yet, I think we’re going to see a rapid expansion of the disease in Southern California in this coming year,” Grafton-Cardwell said.

Early detection is one of the most important things.  Grafton-Cardwell noted that many farmers are “helping to get the research accomplished and, for example, helping to get early detection techniques tested, and things like that so that we can try and stay on top of the disease.”

In California, production trees are not required to be screened, but many nurseries are now shifting towards putting all of their trees under screening in an effort to be more proactive in guarding against the spread of HLB.

Biological controls like Tamarixia are used as a means to reduce the number Asian citrus psyllids, which cause HLB, but that type of control method is not designed to completely eradicate insects.

“They’re starting to release the Tamarixia Wasps in Bakersfield. So we’re getting them up into the San Joaquin Valley so they can help out in those urban areas,” Grafton-Cardwell said.

Dogs are also used as a means to detect infected trees, but there is still a need for more effective techniques.  “A large team of dogs can do maybe 1,000 acres a day, and we’ve got 300,000 acres of commercial citrus. So I think we need a multitude of techniques,” Grafton-Cardwell said.

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fresh plaza logo

The Australian Government’s Department of Agriculture and Water Resources has released an Industry Advice Notice (IAN) advising that New Zealand has suspended imports of Australian rockmelons and honeydew melons that have been treated with dimethoate. This suspension is effective immediately.

Summary of changes and key points:

  • The New Zealand National Plant Protection Organisation has advised that, effective immediately, they will no longer be accepting consignments of rockmelons or honeydew melons that have been treated with dimethoate.
  • The suspension includes consignments that are currently in transit.
  • The department will not be issuing certification with EXDOC endorsement 1646 for rockmelons or EXDOC endorsement 3576 for honeydew melons.
  • Exports sourced from pest-free areas are still permitted.

source: foodprocessing.com.au

Publication date: 4/12/2017

 

 

 

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