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Archive for the ‘Pest and Disease records’ Category

“We are confident that we can quickly contain this outbreak thanks to the experience we have containing it”

Authorities confirm the presence of Fusarium R4 in a plant at a farm in the Colombian department of Magdalena

The Colombian Agricultural Institute (ICA) and the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development confirmed the presence of Fusarium Tropical Race 4, Foc R4T, in a Cavendish banana plant at a farm located in a municipality of the Magdalena department.

“This plantation has 193,461 banana plants planted in 108.53 hectares and we have only detected one single plant affected. The sample was analyzed at the ICA Phytosanitary Diagnostic Laboratory in Soledad-Atlántico, which confirmed that plant tissue was affected by the disease,” the authorities stated.

Based on the experience in the management of Fusarium in La Guajira, which has yielded excellent results, the ICA, the Ministry of Agriculture, Asbama, and Augura deployed the protocols established for the control and prevention of the spread of the fungus in Magdalena. Additionally, and as part of the outbreak delimitation process, authorities are taking 170 plant samples this week in a 5 km radius from the farm, which covers a total of 7 farms.

“We are confident that we can quickly contain this outbreak thanks to the experience we have gotten containing and managing Fusarium,” stated the Minister of Agriculture, Rodolfo Zea Navarro. The national government is coordinating with all the institutions, mayors, and unions the actions necessary to generate confidence in world markets, he added.

The general manager of ICA, Deyanira Barrero Leon, said the pathogen was detected in a single plant in the entire farm. “We took five more samples from the same farm which were negative for Foc R4T and we immediately complemented this case with 40 samples from plants from the same lot and neighboring lots.”

To contain the spread of the plague, the entities established the creation of a Fusarium management group with a scientific, technical, and academic committee. They will also build a risk map or matrix with the identification of neuralgic points, to be able to take specific actions.

The Association of Banana Growers of Colombia (Augura) requested the creation of a washing and disinfection station in Orihueca. They also said it was essential to define support for small producers in the region for the short, medium, and long term.

Source: rcnradio.com

Publication date: Fri 24 Dec 2021

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ENTOMOLOGY TODAYLEAVE A COMMENT

Reports in Canada and Minnesota have documented 

Leaf-Mining Moth May Be New Pest of Soybean

ENTOMOLOGY TODAYLEAVE A COMMENT

Reports in Canada and Minnesota have documented Macrosaccus morrisella, a native leaf-mining moth species (adult shown here), infesting soybean. While the potential threat the species poses to soybean crops remains to be seen, a new guide in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management profiles the species and alerts growers on what to watch for. (Photo by Joseph Moisan-De Serres)

By Arthur Vieira Ribeiro, Ph.D., and Robert L. Koch, Ph.D.

Robert L. Koch, Ph.D.

Arthur Vieira Ribeiro, Ph.D.

Soybean is an important crop used as food and feed worldwide, and the United States is one of the major producers. A plethora of herbivores, including native and invasive species, colonize and feed on soybean plants. Among this herbivorous community, some species are considered more menacing because they can cause economic damage when in high numbers. As if this community was not large enough already, a native leaf-mining insect, Macrosaccus morrisella, appears to have joined in, expanding its range of host plants to now include soybean, as well.

In a paper published in November in the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management—in collaboration with Joseph Moisan-De Serres from the Quebec Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food—we provide first reports of this insect feeding on soybean in Canada and the United States. In Québec, Canada, leaf mines were observed over several years and, more recently, also in soybean fields in Minnesota, United States. Heavy infestations with more than 10 mines per leaflet were observed in Québec, while only light infestations with scattered plants showing symptoms were seen in Minnesota.

Macrosaccus morrisella larva on soybean leaf
Macrosaccus morrisella soybean damage

Several small beetles are known to mine the leaves of soybean in North America, but M. morrisella is actually a tiny moth (larvae: 4.7 millimeters long; adults: 6-7 millimeters). Macrosaccus morrisella is known to feed on plants of the Fabaceae family, including American hog peanut. Soybean is a member of this same plant family. Macrosaccus morrisella larvae feed inside the soybean leaves, and the injury—white-colored, blotch-type leaf mines—can be easily detected on the lower surface of the leaves.

The actual damage this new herbivore can cause to soybean production and extent of infestations in soybean fields in North America are still unknown. Next steps should focus on assessing its potential impacts to soybean, geographic extent of infestations of soybean fields, and ecology in agroecosystems. Such information and knowledge on other leaf miners in soybean will help the development of management practices, in case infestations of this new herbivore in soybean increase.

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First Reports of Macrosaccus morrisella (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) Feeding on Soybean, Glycine max (Fabales: Fabaceae)

Journal of Integrated Pest Management

Arthur Vieira Ribeiro, Ph.D. is a postdoctoral associate and Robert L. Koch, Ph.D., is an associate professor and extension entomologist both at the University of Minnesota Department of Entomology. Email: vieir054@umn.edukoch0125@umn.edu.

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Stink Bugs: New IPM Guide for Midwestern Corn, Soybean Growers

May 4, 2017

Learnings From Latin America: Potential Risk of Helicoverpa armigera to U.S. Soybean Production

February 1, 2021

From Mapping to Management: A Revision of Soybean Caterpillar Pest Information for U.S. Soybean

November 10, 2021 Research News

s morrisella, a native leaf-mining moth species (adult shown here), infesting soybean. While the potential threat the species poses to soybean crops remains to be seen, a new guide in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management profiles the species and alerts growers on what to watch for. (Photo by Joseph Moisan-De Serres)

By Arthur Vieira Ribeiro, Ph.D., and Robert L. Koch, Ph.D.

Robert L. Koch, Ph.D.

Arthur Vieira Ribeiro, Ph.D.

Soybean is an important crop used as food and feed worldwide, and the United States is one of the major producers. A plethora of herbivores, including native and invasive species, colonize and feed on soybean plants. Among this herbivorous community, some species are considered more menacing because they can cause economic damage when in high numbers. As if this community was not large enough already, a native leaf-mining insect, Macrosaccus morrisella, appears to have joined in, expanding its range of host plants to now include soybean, as well.

In a paper published in November in the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management—in collaboration with Joseph Moisan-De Serres from the Quebec Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food—we provide first reports of this insect feeding on soybean in Canada and the United States. In Québec, Canada, leaf mines were observed over several years and, more recently, also in soybean fields in Minnesota, United States. Heavy infestations with more than 10 mines per leaflet were observed in Québec, while only light infestations with scattered plants showing symptoms were seen in Minnesota.

Macrosaccus morrisella larva on soybean leaf
Macrosaccus morrisella soybean damage

Several small beetles are known to mine the leaves of soybean in North America, but M. morrisella is actually a tiny moth (larvae: 4.7 millimeters long; adults: 6-7 millimeters). Macrosaccus morrisella is known to feed on plants of the Fabaceae family, including American hog peanut. Soybean is a member of this same plant family. Macrosaccus morrisella larvae feed inside the soybean leaves, and the injury—white-colored, blotch-type leaf mines—can be easily detected on the lower surface of the leaves.

The actual damage this new herbivore can cause to soybean production and extent of infestations in soybean fields in North America are still unknown. Next steps should focus on assessing its potential impacts to soybean, geographic extent of infestations of soybean fields, and ecology in agroecosystems. Such information and knowledge on other leaf miners in soybean will help the development of management practices, in case infestations of this new herbivore in soybean increase.

Read More

First Reports of Macrosaccus morrisella (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae) Feeding on Soybean, Glycine max (Fabales: Fabaceae)

Journal of Integrated Pest Management

Arthur Vieira Ribeiro, Ph.D. is a postdoctoral associate and Robert L. Koch, Ph.D., is an associate professor and extension entomologist both at the University of Minnesota Department of Entomology. Email: vieir054@umn.edukoch0125@umn.edu.

SHARE THIS:

Stink Bugs: New IPM Guide for Midwestern Corn, Soybean Growers

May 4, 2017

Learnings From Latin America: Potential Risk of Helicoverpa armigera to U.S. Soybean Production

February 1, 2021

From Mapping to Management: A Revision of Soybean Caterpillar Pest Information for U.S. Soybean

November 10, 2021 Research News

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From Mapping to Management: A Revision of Soybean Caterpillar Pest Information for U.S. Soybean

ENTOMOLOGY TODAY1 COMMENT

Lepidopteran pests of soybean—such as the green cloverworm (Hypena scabra), shown here—are growing in importance in the U.S., and a pair of articles in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management provides updated guidance on biology, distribution, and management options for five leading caterpillar pests of soybean. (Photo by Adam Varenhorst)

By Erin Hodgson, Ph.D., and Anders Huseth, Ph.D.

Anders Huseth, Ph.D.

Erin Hodgson, Ph.D.

There never seems to be a dull summer when you’re an extension entomologist of field crops. Like Coolio said, there is always “sumpin’ new” happening in agriculture. Fluctuating pest populations and invasive species make our jobs interesting. Add in new chemistries and technology updates, and it’s hard to keep up with everything.

When a pest does establish and become a problem, we want to provide accurate identification and timely management recommendations. Unfortunately, many of our tried-and-true resources are becoming out of date. New extension folks have been especially frustrated by a lack of current resources. In particular, there is not enough current information on caterpillars feeding in soybean, though these pests are becoming more economically important in the U.S. and around the world. So, a few of us decided to create an update for some of the most prominent species in U.S. soybean. We represent five states spread across the nation: Florida, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, and North Carolina.

caterpillar pests of soybean
corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea)
thistle caterpillar (Vanessa cardui)

To start, we surveyed field crop entomologists in all soybean-growing states to better understand current pest occurrence and abundance in soybean (approximately 83 million acres). We compiled data from all 31 soybean-producing states during the winter of 2020. Data indicated five species that consistently bubbled to the top of the list: green cloverworm (Hypena scabra), soybean looper (Chrysodeixis includens), corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea), velvetbean caterpillar (Anticarsia gemmatalis), and painted lady (Vanessa cardui, also known as thistle caterpillar in its larval form).

After summarizing survey information, we decided to write profiles on these species to improve identification, distribution, and scouting guidelines. Our group used older research and recent field observations to develop profiles of these key pests. Last, we wanted to focus on management, especially highlighting insecticide resistance issues starting to become prominent in some states. The results of this work are shared in two articles published earlier this year in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management—one on identification and biology and another on distribution and population persistence—with a third article still in the works.

Results from our survey provide a contemporary assessment of distribution and persistence of lepidopterans in soybean. Like the aforementioned rap artist says, field crop extension entomology is a “fantastic voyage,” and we hope the articles help provide updated information for caterpillar identification and management.

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Identification and Biology of Common Caterpillars in U.S. Soybean

Current Distribution and Population Persistence of Five Lepidopteran Pests in U.S. Soybean

Journal of Integrated Pest Management

Erin Hodgson, Ph.D., is a professor and extension entomologist at Iowa State University. Email: ewh@iastate.eduAnders Huseth, Ph.D., is an assistant professor and extension specialist at North Carolina State University. Email: ashuseth@ncsu.edu.

Soybean Gall Midge: Discovery of a Delicate and Destructive New Species

March 9, 2021

New Guide Offers IPM Tips for Japanese Beetles in Soy and Corn

April 29, 2019

Learnings From Latin America: Potential Risk of Helicoverpa armigera to U.S. Soybean Production

February 1, 2021

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First finding of pathotype 38 (Nevşehir) of Synchytrium endobioticum in the Netherlands

The NPPO of the Netherlands recently informed the EPPO Secretariat of the first detection of the pathotype 38 (Nevşehir) of Synchytrium endobioticum (EPPO A2 List, agent of potato wart disease) on its territory. 

As part of the annual official survey of starch and ware potatoes, the presence of
 S. endobioticum was detected in October 2020 in 3 fields (total of 14.43 ha) in the municipality of Stadskanaal (Province of Groningen). Starch potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) presented typical warts. The pathotype was determined in July 2021 on the basis of a bio-assay (Spieckermann method) in combination with sequencing of the mitochondrial DNA of the isolates. It is the first time that pathotype 38 (Nevşehir) is found in the Netherlands and the NPPO considers that the source of the outbreak is outside the Netherlands. This pathotype is only known to occur in Turkey (where it was initally reported), Bulgaria and Georgia.

Official phytosanitary measures are applied: all 3 fields have been demarcated as infested areas for at least 20 years, together with a buffer zone and safety zone, as defined in Council Directive 69/464/EC. The production of potato is prohibited in the infested area and only resistant potato varieties may be grown in the buffer and safety zones. The production of plants for planting (e.g. seed potato) is prohibited in all demarcated areas.

During autumn 2021 the annual survey for S. endobioticum will focus on detection of this new pathotype in this area.

The pest status of Synchytrium endobioticum in the Netherlands is officially declared as: Present, under eradication, only in demarcated areas.

Sources

NPPO of the Netherlands (2021-09).

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October 7, 2021

James Cullum

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Update: New Pest & Disease Records (6 October 2021)

new pest records: mirid bug
This month’s pest alerts include the first report of mirid bugs as a threat to bottle gourd in India (Photograph © Bernard Dupont – CC BY-SA 2.0)

We’ve selected a few of the latest new geographic, host and species records for plant pests and diseases from CAB Abstracts. Records this month include a new species of Trionymus from Mexico and the first report of mirid bugs as a threat to bottle gourd in India.


To view all search results for new geographic, host and species records for plant pests and diseases, click here or to view results by your location click here.

If there’s another new record you’d like to highlight, please post a comment.

View past pest alertscrop pests and diseasesmirid bugpest alertsAgriculture and International DevelopmentCrop healthPlant Sciences

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