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October 7, 2021

Laura Hollis

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Watch the PlantwisePlus Launch Video

This week saw the digital launch of CABI’s new global programme – PlantwisePlus. The online event featured presentations from both CABI representatives as well as partner organisations, including FAO and the governments of Kenya and the Netherlands.https://www.youtube.com/embed/YwglWPNK1m0?feature=oembedPlantwisePlus launch video

The event was an opportunity to highlight the impact CABI’s Plantwise and Action on Invasives programmes have had since launching in 2011 and how PlantwisePlus aims to build on those achievements.

Contributors to the event included:

– Dr Daniel Elger, Chief Executive Officer, CABI

– Dr Ismahane Elouafi, Chief Scientist, FAO

– Prof Hamadi Boga, Permanent Secretary at the Kenyan Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries

– Astrid Mastenbroek, Senior Policy Advisor on Food and Nutritional Security at the Netherlands Minsitry for Foreign Affairs

– Dr Ulrich Kuhlman, Executive Director of Global Operations, CABI

– Dr Dennis Rangi, Director General for Development, CABI

In his welcome address, CABI’s CEO Daniel Elger spoke of the knowledge and experience that underpins CABI’s work in solving problems in agriculture and the environment.

“That’s why CABI is so well positioned to deliver a global programme that will make a significant impact, helping smallholder farmers to have increased incomes and grow safer and higher quality food through sustainable approaches to crop production.”

Daniel Elger, Chief Executive Officer, CABI

Dr Ismahane Elouafi, FAO Chief Scientist, spoke of the challenges facing plant health and global food systems. In her presentation, Dr Elouafi emphasised the importance of stakeholder development programmes such as PlantwisePlus in tackling the challenges facing agri-food system.

“These programs had improved farmers yields, so there is more food and more income for rural communities. …  FAO has collaborated in many areas with CABI in the past and we look forward to working with CABI again with their PlantwisePlus programme.”

Dr Ismahane Elouafi, Chief Scientist, FAO
PlantwisePlus launch
Female farmer © CABI

Professor Hamadi Boga, Permanent Secretary at the Kenyan Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries spoke of the impact Plantwise has had in Kenya over the last ten years. Pests and diseases are major obstacles to productivity among Kenyan farmers. Since 2011, the Kenyan government has been working with Plantwise to address these challenges.

“Workers have up-to-date information and, the platform that has been created out of this project, will guarantee success and increase productivity and higher income for farmers.”

Professor Hamadi Boga, Permanent Secretary at the Kenyan Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries

Astrid Mastenbroek, Senior Policy Advisor on Food and Nutritional Security at the Netherlands Ministry for Foreign Affairs explained why the Netherlands government-supported Plantwise in the past and will be supporting PlantwisePlus going forward.

“We expect that PlantwisePlus will contribute significantly to sustainable agricultural development … we look forward to the successful delivery of this programme.”

Astrid Mastenbroek, Netherlands Minsitry for Foreign Affairs

CABI’s Executive Director of Global Operations, Dr Ulrich Kuhlman, is also the new PlantwisePlus Programme Executive. Dr Kuhlman provided an outline of PlantwisePlus including the challenges the programme seeks to address and the outcomes being worked towards.

Dr Kuhlman gave details on the four focus areas for the new programme: (a) strengthening detection of and response to pest outbreaks; (b) providing public and private agricultural service providers with better digital advisory tools to support farmers in sustainable crop management; (c) enhancing the availability of nature-positive and low-risk plant protection products to reduce reliance on high-risk farm inputs; (d) increasing consumer demand for and supply to local markets of safer, higher quality and locally produced food.

Attendees were invited to participate in a question-and-answer session with the PlantwisePlus global team leaders: Claire CurryDr Monica KansiimeDr Ivan Rwomushana and Dr Belinda Luke. They were joined by Dr Wade Jenner, Deputy Programme Executive for PlantwisePlus.

The event ended with a closing statement from CABI’s Director General for Development, Dr Dennis Rangi. Dr Rangi thanked the donors for their contributions to the event.

“PlantwisePlus is a programme built on partnerships and it is precisely this spirit of collaboration that we have experienced today that will ensure the success of the programme.”

Dr Dennis Rangi, Director General for Development, CABI

The e-launch is now available online: watch the PlantwisePlus launch

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Diagnostic Entomology Photography Workshop

USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s Identification Technology Program (ITP), in collaboration with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, announce a virtual workshop on techniques for producing high quality, identification-worthy images of insects and other arthropods, for publication in digital identification tools.

Please save the date: October 19, 2021, at 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm Eastern time (U.S.), for a workshop via Zoom.

If you have any questions about the workshop, feel free to just reply to this email. (Or, you may contact Hume Douglas (hume.douglas@agr.gc.ca) with questions).

Cheers,

Amanda

Amanda Redford 

Identification Technology Program (ITP)

USDA APHIS PPQ Science & Technology (S&T)

amanda.j.redford@usda.gov| https://idtools.org

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Click here to view in browser.   SIL’s NEW Soybean Rust Crash Course and Rust Spray Calculator available now!
JULY 29, 2021 Soybean field with heavy rust pressure (brown patches) interspersed with strips that were treated for soybean rust with fungicide. Photo credit: Sikora et al.   Soybean rust is one of the most significant diseases that affects soybean yield. It can spread quickly and cause up to an 80% loss in yield. It’s a frustrating challenge for producers and breeders, but there are practices and management techniques that growers can employ to ensure a good return on investment for their soybean production.

SIL’s new course, the Soybean Rust Crash Course, is designed for growers, practitioners, breeders, and researchers to learn how to identify the disease, scout for disease at the optimal stage, and manage the disease before it’s too late.     The Soybean Rust Crash Course is free and includes four modules: 1. The Pathogen and symptoms; 2. Scouting; 3. Management; and 4. For breeders and researchers, more information on data collection and varietal resistance.

Module 3 covers disease management and includes a Rust Spray Calculator, designed to aid in environmentally responsible and economically feasible decision-making on whether or not fungicides should be used to control rust outbreaks. The calculator bases recommendations on growth of the crop and rust pressure, and then determines the economic gain that can be achieved by considering a grower’s local fungicide cost, labor cost, and grain price.   The Rust Spray Calculator provides growers with evidence-based decision making on whether they should use fungicides to control rust observed in their fields.   The importance of scouting a field from beginning bloom to full seed development cannot be overemphasized. Finding the disease before it takes over provides an opportunity to spray with fungicide and save up to 80% of yield. The Soybean Rust Crash Course, combined with the Rust Spray Calculator, provides specific recommendations for growers, from scouting techniques and identification of soybean rust, to analyzing the potential economic benefits of spraying. For breeders and researchers, the course goes into more depth about plot-level data collection and the current state of varietal resistance.

Successful completion of the Soybean Rust Crash Course will result in a Certificate of Completion that can be shared on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.   SIL’s Disease Management program has several other resources that complement the new Soybean Rust Crash Course and Rust Spray Calculator including: The Field Guide to African Disease, Pests, and Nutrition Deficiencies The Guide to African Soybean Seedborne Diseases and Pests The Soybean Rust Disease Bulletin The Soybean Innovation Lab Disease and Pest ID Board on Facebook The Rust Hot Spot Map – see below You can find several other free courses at SIL-University   The Tropical Soybean Information Portal (TSIP) features a Rust Hot Spot Map. The map is a tool containing trial and operator information on rust disease incidence and severity over seven seasons and 57 locations. To view the Rust Hot Spot Map, click on the pathogen icon on the left side of the map located on the TSIP homepage.     Like On Facebook Like On Facebook Follow On Twitter Follow On Twitter Visit Our Website Visit Our Website Contact Us Contact Us   Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Soybean Value Chain Research (Soybean Innovation Lab)
1301 West Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 * Tel. (217) 333-7425 * soybeaninnovationlab@illinois.edu  

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NEMEDUSSA CONSORTIUM ADVANCING NEMATOLOGY EDUCATION IN SUB-SAHARA AFRICA

To develop the research and educational capacity in Sub-Sahara Africa in the field of nematology, or the study of roundworms, a joint Erasmus+ KA2 project was recently launched. The Erasmus+ project, Capacity Building in Higher Education (CBHE): Nematology Education in Sub-Sahara Africa (NEMEDUSSA), is a joint effort by a consortium of Universities from Sub-Sahara Africa and Europe.

This three-year project (2021-2023) is co-funded by the European Union (Erasmus+ KA2 CBHE) and VLIR-UOS, and is linked to the objectives of the Erasmus+ Programme. The aims are to encourage cooperation between the EU and Partner Countries and support eligible Partner Countries in addressing challenges in the management and governance of their higher education institutions.

Specifically, NEMEDUSSA aims to increase awareness of nematodes and expand educational and research capacities in higher education and other institutions in Sub-Sahara Africa in this field. Nematodes or roundworms cause significant damage and yield loss to a wide variety of crops often together with other pathogens. Unfortunately, nematodes are often overlooked or misdiagnosed, resulting in the unnecessary use of unhealthy agro-chemicals. Nematodes can also be used as bio-control agents against insect pests and/or as bio-control agents for environmental health and biodiversity.

Despite the profound adverse impact plant-parasitic nematodes have on productivity worldwide, it is striking how concealed the discipline of nematology has remained, particularly in Sub-Sahara Africa. This project aims to address the need for increased capacity and specialised training in handling these pathogens, so that plant-parasitic nematodes are managed correctly and beneficial nematodes can be implemented as biocontrol organisms.

To achieve this, the project focuses on 6 core activities:

  1. Developing Curricula. Develop curricula in nematology on BSc and MSc level for the integration into existing educational programmes in English and French, for both lecturers and students.
  2. Training Staff. Improve the nematological expertise of academic and technical staff to enhance teaching capacity.
  3. Upgrading lab facilities. Increase the number of student microscopes, lab and demonstration equipment to augment hands-on training.
  4. Nematology digital learning platform. Develop an open-access platform to share and disseminate nematological knowledge, develop curricular modules, knowledge clips, etc.
  5. Nematology Network. Enhance cooperation between nematologists in Sub-Sahara Africa by providing networking tools, workshops on relevant topics in nematology and sharing good practices in education, promoting collaboration with a focus on young nematologists.
  6. Creating awareness. Facilitate dissemination activities and involve a range of different stakeholders such as farmers, extension service workers, policy makers, students and private and public sector.

Ghent University (Belgium) coordinates NEMEDUSSA, in cooperation with:

  • University Abomey-Calavi, Benin
  • University of Parakou, Benin
  • Haramaya University, Ethiopia
  • Jimma University, Ethiopia
  • Kenyatta University, Kenya
  • Moi University, Kenya
  • Ahmadu-Bello University, Nigeria
  • University of Ibadan, Nigeria
  • North West University, South Africa
  • Stellenbosch University, South Africa
  • Makerere University, Uganda
  • Muni University, Uganda
  • University Côte d’Azur, France

The work of this project is further supported by 36 associated partners from the private and public sectors in Sub-Sahara Africa.

For more information about the NEMEDUSSA project, please see www.nemedussa.ugent.be or contact us at nemedussa@ugent.be.  

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The Hellenic (Greek) Society of Phytiatry is requesting your support (Yes or No) of the introduction of Plant Medicine (Plant Doctor) in academia as a distinct university curriculum. The very brief survey (electronic vote) can be found at:

http://www.fytiatriki.gr/support-fytiatry

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Rice Diseases Online Resource

This online resource is authored by 23 global rice disease specialists who cover the importance of 80 plant diseases in rice production, the biology of these diseases, and selected disease management practices.

Specifications

Mew, TW, Hibino H, Savary S, Vera Cruz CM, Opulencia R, Hettel GP, eds. 2017. Rice diseases: Biology and selected management practices

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Biological control training courses for advanced-level graduate students and junior faculty will concurrently be held in Beijing, China and Hanoi, Vietnam, September 02-09, 2017. If you are interested in further information or in applying to join these sessions please contact Dr. Kris Wyckhuys <k.wyckhuys@cgiar.org> or Mrs. My Hoang  <m.hoang@cgiar.org>.

E.A. Heinrichs

IAPPS Secretary General

iobc_1

iobc_2

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Posted Mon at 10:02pm

A potentially devastating plant virus able to infect a number of horticultural crops has been detected for the first time in Western Australia.

The Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus has been found in a continental cucumber crop near Geraldton, about 400 kilometres north of Perth.

In 2014 the virus was first found in Australia in watermelon crops near Katherine in the Northern Territory. Crops were destroyed and the region was placed under quarantine restrictions for nearly two years.

Geraldton is a significant production region for Australia’s continental cucumber crop.

CGMMV affects a range of cucurbit crops such as cucumbers, melons, pumpkins, squash and can cause substantial crop losses.

Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia Chief plant biosecurity officer John van Schagen said DAFWA would investigate the disease source, however the obvious pathway was from infected seed.

“One of our staff is going up to Geraldton. It’s definitely on the one property, possibly a second one and maybe even more, we don’t know at this stage,” he said.

“We diagnosed it from cucumber leaf samples that were submitted by an agronomist.

“Diagnosis was completed late the week before last.

“We notified Vegetables WA and we also notified people up in Kununurra.

Mr van Schagen said it was yet to be seen how the Geraldton cucumber crop would be effected by the virus.

“It’s got potential to be fairly serious,” he said.

“We haven’t quarantined the property because last year a scientific expert panel looked at what is the risk of spreading this disease through movement of produce, they deemed that was a very low risk, so I think this disease can best be managed by good on farm biosecurity practices.

“Measures include not permitting vehicles, equipment and machinery to move between farms without being thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.

“This also applies to farm workers, by making sure they wear clean clothing when they leave or move between properties.”

Local cucumber growers told ABC Rural they were worried about the virus and were paying close attention to farm hygiene, such as foot baths and hand sanitising.

“There is a national management plan being developed for this disease, that was started after the cases in the Northern Territory, so that’s currently sitting with some national industry bodies for finalising, but we hope to push that through fairly quickly, and that’s got all the information on how best to manage this disease for growers,” Mr van Schagen said.

“We are also doing some research ourselves in management of this disease as well.

“My understanding is once you’ve got it, it’s very difficult to treat. Basically if it’s in the crop you can’t really get it out of the crop. It’s through good on farm biosecurity and also crop rotation, you may be able to minimise the impact of the disease.

“I think that’s what they do in the Northern Territory, they have a two year period where they don’t plant any host plants on the property. Thereby they try to eliminate it from the soil.”

Mr van Schagen said the department would meet with growers to discuss possible crop rotations and gain feedback from growers on the impact the virus had caused in their cucumber crops.

DAFWA will host an information meeting at the Geraldton office on Wednesday, July 27 at 4.30pm.

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Global Plant Protection News Followers:

Please note the wealth of CABI Plant Protection content available on the Plantwise Knowledge Bank: http://www.plantwise.org/KnowledgeBank/Home.aspx

Subjects: Pest identification/ Pest distribution/Fact sheets/Pest alerts/Plant Health News/Plantwise Blog

E.A. Heinrichs /IAPPS Secretary General

 

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Plant clinics

Plantwise provides training to local people so they can set up plant clinics in their region. These clinics operate on a regular basis, in easy-to-access places, and allow farmers to bring in samples of their crop problems for diagnosis and advice.The Plantwise Diagnostic Field Guide has been developed to support this.

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AsEAN Guidelines

http://www.asean-agrifood.org/what-we-do/regulation-and-application-of-bca/
This eight-minute video tries to set the stage for approach of ASEAN Sustainable Agrifood System (SAS) towards the healthy production of crops. The Video deals with the mythical view of synthetic pesticide on our daily food crops and discusses potential alternatives such as the use of biological pest management. This video also provides some opinions of crop producers, consumer and members of ASEAN Sustainable Agrifood System (SAS) project to complete the picture.

 

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